Virtual Public Program Archive

Behind the Scenes with Mimi & Allison

A never-before-seen Baltimore Album Quilt with our Vice President of Collections, Allison Tolman and Hometown Girl contemporary quilter, Mimi Dietrich. Watch as they discuss this Baltimore Album Quilt being featured in our upcoming exhibition Wild and Untamed: Dunton’s Discovery of the Baltimore Album Quilts opening fall 2020.

Watch Now

 

One More (Virtual) Return to Hutzler's and Howard Street

Join our hosts Martha Oster-Beal and Margot Kopera and enjoy one more (virtual) trip to Howard Street. Hear the stories of Hutzler’s, Hochschild’s, Hecht’s, Stewart’s and the other establishments that comprised Baltimore’s former bustling commercial district. Noted department store historian, lecturer, BSO oboist, and author Michael Lisicky will explain why Baltimoreans still hold Hutzler’s, and many similar institutions, dear to their hearts.

Watch Now

 

Marvelous Style: How Fashion Defines Characters in the Marvelous Mrs. Maisel

Join our hosts Martha Oster-Beal and Margot Kopera for a virtual happy hour into the 1950s fashions of the Marvelous Mrs. Maisel. With Allison Tolman, the Maryland Historical Society’s Vice President of Collections, they take a retro deep-dive into the iconic looks derived from real historical designs that evolve with the characters of the Amazon Prime Video series. See how real 1950s designs were reinterpreted, and how Maryland-native Claire McCardell served as the go-to inspiration for modern women as we investigate how fashion defines characters in The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel.

Watch Now

 

Collecting in Crisis: Responsive Collecting in a Digital Age

Museums and Libraries are at the forefront of collecting and documenting history. But what do you do when history is happening all around you and you can’t get out and do the collecting? How do you document history as is happens in a digital age? This COVID-19-focused webinar led by the Maryland Historical Society aims to provide a roadmap for cultural institutions on crowd-sourced collecting of born-digital materials. The Maryland Historical Society, Virginia Museum of History & Culture, Salisbury University, and DC Public Library will share their approaches to developing, building infrastructure, and conducting outreach to create successful responsive collecting initiatives in a digital age.

Watch Now

 

Fashion and Crisis: Looking to the Past to Understand How Fashion Might Change in the Future

This week, our hosts Martha Oster-Beal and Margot Kopera welcome Victoria Pass, a Visual Culture specialist and Assistant Professor at the Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA) as she discusses Fashion & Crisis. We find ourselves in a moment of crisis and everything seems to be changing rapidly, including how we dress. How will fashion change as a result of this crisis? By looking back at how fashion changed during the two world wars we can see how significant shifts in fashion have often been pushed forward in times like these. From the use of protective clothing for factory work and air raid shelters to rationing and women wearing trousers, fashion has responded to and reflected the changes in people's everyday lives. will discuss significant shifts in fashion trends throughout history and how they tend to happen in the wake of crisis.

Watch Now

 

Partners In Sensuality: A Wine & Chocolate Virtual Date Night!

Treat yourself to a virtual date night and join food historian, Joyce White, as she walks participants through a 18th-century chocolate recipe from her kitchen. Learn about Maryland’s connection to chocolate history and create a decadent modern adaption of a historical recipe. Recipes can be found on Joyce’s blog. Some adult content.

Watch Now

 

Bay to Table: Rethinking Tradition

Historically, Maryland’s seafood industry has heavily relied on a wholesale system for delivering product to the consumer. With restaurants and oyster bars closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, local oystermen are finding new ways to bring those salty bi-valves to your table. Watch this recording of MdHS’s virtual program, Bay to Table: Rethinking Tradition, to learn more about why the oyster industry has been so hard hit and how they are reshaping their way of doing business. Moderated by Kate Livie, Chesapeake educator, writer, and historian with special guests Dylan Salmon, co-owner of Dylan’s Oyster Cellar, Scott Budden, partner of Orchard Point Oyster Co., and Tim Wheeler, associate editor and senior writer at Bay Journal.

Watch Now

 

Cocktails & Conversation with Mark Letzer, President & CEO

Have you ever wondered how the Baltimore Oriole got its name? Or maybe you are curious about the exhibitions we are unveiling later this fall? You’ll learn the answers to these questions and more when you watch this recording of the Maryland Historical Society’s 176th annual meeting (and first ever virtual annual meeting!). President and CEO, Mark Letzer, and Vice President of Education and Strategic Engagement, Katie Caljean, talk about where MdHS is headed and answer questions about the organization from our members. You’ll also hear from outgoing board chair, Louise Lake Hayman, and incoming board chair, Clinton Daly.

Watch Now

 

Quarantine Fashion: A Love Letter to Baltimore Vintage

Tune in to this virtual program, presented by the Maryland’s Historical Society, to learn all about the worldwide phenomenon of #quarantinefashion. Alexandra Deutsch, vintage collector and fashion historian, sheds light on how fashion – particularly vintage clothing – creates community, in Baltimore and beyond. Cara Ober, editor-in-chief of Bmore Art, joins her in conversation.

Watch Now

 

The Black Freedom Struggle in Maryland, a Discussion with the University of Maryland Department of History

MdHS welcomes the University of Maryland, Department of History in this virtual program about Maryland’s Black Freedom Struggle. Presentations by Dr. Christopher Bonner, Dr. Michael Ross, and Dr. Elsa Barkley Brown address the Colonization Movement, African American soldiers in the Civil War, and racial terror during the Jim Crow era in Maryland. Dr. Richard Bell moderates.

Watch Now

 

Virtual Teacher Workshop: African American History and the Freedom Struggle in Maryland

Maryland Historical Society Director of Education, David Armenti, and Museum Learning Manager, Alex Lothstein, demonstrate the value of MdHS collections for instruction about African American history in this unique virtual workshop. Geared toward K-12 and university-level educators, David and Alex model analysis and classroom instruction strategies for complex topics like enslavement, freedom struggles, and civil rights activism. Please contact Alex Lothsetin at [email protected] for supplemental material.

Watch Now

 

Unlocking the Exhibition: Between the Seams of Spectrum of Fashion

Close examination of a historic garment can reveal undiscovered stories about its wearer(s). In this virtual program, Ashlee Anderson, Digital Learning Specialist, and Emily Bach, Curatorial Assistant, take a deep-dive into ten of the pieces on view in the Spectrum of Fashion exhibition at the Maryland Historical Society, providing insight into provenance, fashion trends, and Maryland’s social history.

Watch Now

 

Colonial Market Virtual Tavern Trivia 

Join in the eighteenth-century fun as we go virtual to offer you the best of our annual Colonial Market. Play along with us in a four-round tavern trivia game on topics all-things Colonial Maryland. You’ll meet some of our favorite Colonial Market living history interpreters along the way!

Watch Now

 

Two Sides of the Redline: How Policy Shaped a City of Neighborhoods

Across the United States, patterns of racial and economic segregation can be directly attributed to the systematic denial of mortgage and bank lending to African Americans, known as redlining. These nation-wide discriminatory practices continued legally until 1968, when the Fair Housing Act banned racial discrimination in housing. But 50 years after that law passed, the lingering effects of redlining are clear. In this virtual program experts outline the practice of redlining in Baltimore and discuss the historical, demographic, economic, and traumatic impact these policies continue to have on Black communities today. 

Moderated by David Armenti, MdHS Director of Education with special guests Dr. Corey J. Henderson, historical trauma healing expert; Eric Holcomb, Executive Director of the Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation (CHAP); Antero Pietila, journalist, writer, and author of Not in My Neighborhood; and Delegate Stephanie Smith, District 45, Baltimore City.

Watch Now